The Types Of Specialist Truck Operating On American Roads

The Types Of Specialist Truck Operating On American Roads

From Jhon White

Road-borne logistics are immensely important to American industry and consumer sectors. Here is a guide to some of the vehicle types that navigate America on the road system.

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Road-borne logistics are immensely important to American industry and consumer sectors. Here is a guide to some of the vehicle types that navigate America on the road system.

Box Truck

Box trucks are the simplest and most commonly seen kind of American truck. They consist of a tractor unit pulling a box-shaped trailer.

Car Carrier

Car shipping by road is commonly achieved using specialized shipping trailers that have two decks. The vehicles are loaded using a ramp and then carefully fastened using heavy-duty ratchets to prevent rolling.

Refrigerated

Mechanically cooled trucks were first used commercially around the year 1930. They utilized technology developed by brewing and ice transportation companies to cool railroad boxcars. Today, refrigerated trucks are essential to the food logistics industry and enable fresh vegetables and meat to be delivered to cities all across the United States of America.

Crane Truck

Crane trucks are heavy-duty vehicles that often boast 5 or 6 axles. They are required to have hydraulic stabilizers that can lower before the crane carried on the truck can be put to use. Smaller crane trucks – known as cherry pickers – are used to give workers access to hard-to-reach spaces.

Tanker

Tanker trucks are instantly recognizable, thanks to their cylindrical trailers. They are used to carry all sorts of bulk liquids and chemicals. Cylinders are immensely strong, which makes a cylindrical tank the safest possible shape for carrying liquids and gasses that can expand and contract when exposed to different temperatures. Tanker trucks predate the automobile. Horse-drawn tanker trucks were a common sight during the Victorian period.  

Log Carrier

Log carriers are an extremely common sight in heavily forested areas such as New England and Oregon. Carrying uncut lumber from forestry operation areas to lumber mills involves some unusual challenges. Logs, being cylindrical, tend to roll easily. This means that log carriers have to have extremely strong bracing equipment in order to safely travel on regular highways. The United States Department of Labor lists shifting logs as one of the more common kinds of an accident involving this kind of vehicle.

Flatbed

Flatbed trucks are used to carry abnormally sized and shaped loads. Armored vehicle movers, heavy plant machinery movers, and mobile home movers are all essentially flatbeds. A flatbed truck trailer is extremely simple: usually consisting of a level bed with a ramp for loading and ratchets for fastening a load.

Container

Containerization has revolutionized road, rail, and maritime logistics. Container trucks allow for the easy loading of shipping containers – which is often done at a port. There are an estimated 17 million shipping containers in circulation all around the globe. A huge quantity of the consumer goods that are imported to the United States are moved in shipping containers.

Truck Train

Truck trains – known internationally as road trains – are not a very frequent sight on American roads. They are used in small numbers, usually in the agricultural logistics industry. A truck train consists of one motive power unit dragging more than one trailer. The longest truck trains are seen in Australia, where they slowly move huge amounts of cargo through the interior of the vast country. 

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