Help us Foster an Orphaned Elephant Together!

Help us Foster an Orphaned Elephant Together!

From Brooke Baudot

Almost 100 elephants are killed everyday for their ivory tusk, leaving many babies without their mothers milk & protection. All donations will go to www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org where together we can foster an orphan.

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Without urgent action to save their species, elephants could disappear from the wild within a single generation.

Almost 100 elephants are killed each day for their ivory tusks which are now worth more than gold and can be worth tens of thousands of dollars per tusk. This leaves many baby elephants unable to fend for themselves and unable to survive without their mothers milk.

 

Organizations such as the DSWT set out to protect and rehabilitate these majestic animals.

"The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust embraces all measures that compliment the conservation, preservation and protection of wildlife. These include anti-poaching, safe guarding the natural environment, enhancing community awareness, addressing animal welfare issues, providing veterinary assistance to animals in need, rescuing and hand rearing elephant and rhino orphans, along with other species that can ultimately enjoy a quality of life in wild terms when grown."

To read more about the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust visit www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org

 

 

A few facts about these majestic creatures:

1.) Elephants are highly intelligent creatures. Elephant brains weigh 5 kg, much more than the brain of any other land animal. Their brains have more complex folds than all animals except whales, which is thought to be a major factor in making them some of the most intelligent animals on Earth.

 

2.) Elephants have a more developed hippocampus, a brain region responsible for emotion and spatial awareness, than any other animal.

 

3.) Elephants commonly show grief, humor, compassion, cooperation, self-awareness, tool use, playfulness, and excellent learning abilities.

 

4.) There are many reports of elephants showing altruism toward other species, such as rescuing trapped dogs at considerable cost to themselves.

 

5.) An elephant herd is considered one of the most closely knit societies of any animal, and a female will only leave it if she dies or is captured by humans.

 

6.) Female African elephants undergo the longest pregnancy — 22 months. Elephants have been known to induce labour by self-medicating with certain plants.

  • Baby elephants are initially blind and some take to sucking their trunk for comfort in the same way that humans suck their thumbs.
  • Baby elephants are dependent on their mothers milk for up to 3-4 years, although they can be weaned off at 2 years of age.
  • The calf will learn how and what vegetation to eat as they grow older by watching the older elephants

7.) Mothers will select several babysitters to care for the calf so that she has time to eat enough to produce sufficient milk for it.

8.) Elephants can recognize themselves in a mirror.

9.) Elephants are very social, frequently touching and caressing one another and entwining their trunks.

10.) Elephants demonstrate concern for members of their families and take care of weak or injured members of the herd.

11.) Elephants grieve for their dead. Even herds that come across an unknown lone elephant who has died will show it similar respects.

12.) Elephants communicate within their herds or between herds many kilometers away by stomping their feet and making sounds too low for human ears to perceive.

13.) Elephants are Africa’s gardeners and landscape engineers, planting seeds and creating habitat wherever they roam.

We will foster our baby under the Soul Full Yogi's name.

Each month I will post pictures and updates of our baby on the Soul Full Yoga facebook and instagram. You can also request to join our facebook group --> Soul Full Yogi's - where I will be sharing this info as well!

Together we can make a difference.

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