Save the Honey Bees

Save the Honey Bees

From Uwe Rusch

We save bees free of charge and resettle them into safe habitats. We need money for the apiaries, the average cost of each USD300.00. About 38% of bee colonies in the USA died during the last 2 years. Please help us!

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Update #14

6 months ago

What is Honey?

Honey is a supersaturated sugar solution with approximately 17.1 percent water. Fructose is the predominant sugar at 38.5 percent, followed by glucose at 31 percent. Disac- charides, trisac -charides and oligosaccharides are present in much smaller quantities.

Honey is a pretty amazing substance and there is a lot more to it than just a sweet-tasting treat. Honey plays a crucial role in the life of a honey bee and can also be very beneficial to the human body. We invite you to learn more about honey and bees and how they can enrich our lives.

HONEY FACTS & NUTRITION

Honey is a pretty amazing substance and there is a lot more to it than just a sweet-tasting treat. Honey plays a crucial role in the life of a honey bee and can also be very beneficial to the human body. I invite you to learn more about honey and bees and how they can enrich our lives.

HONEY FACTS

There are over 25,000 species of bees worldwide.
- An adult worker bee's lifespan is about 45 days during the summer
months.
- A typical Bee colony consists of 30,000 to 60,000 bees.
- Male bees are called "Drones" and they do not have stingers, their only
purpose is to mate with the queen bee.
- A queen bee can sting multiple times without dying.
- 99% of the bee colony is made up of female bees known as worker
bees.
- The average honey bee's wings flap over 183 times per second.
- Bees have an excellent sense of smell which allows them to find their
hive.
- Honey Bees actually dance when they return to the hive to tell the
other bees where the flowers are.
- Honey is the ONLY food source produced by an insect that humans
eat.
- Worker honey bees transform the floral nectar the gather into honey
by adding enzymes to the nectar and reducing the moisture.

Honey is a supersaturated sugar solution with approximately 17.1 percent water. Fructose is the predominant sugar at 38.5 percent, followed by glucose at 31 percent. Disac- charides, trisac -charides and oligosaccharides are present in much smaller quantities. Besides carbohydrates, honey contains small amounts of protein, enzymes, vitamins, and minerals. Honey is known to be rich in both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, including catalase, ascorbic acid, flavonoids, and alkaloids. Although appearing only in trace amounts honey also contains about 18 different amino acids.

Each variety of honey has characteristics that make that each one unique. Some of the main characteristics are color, granulation, moisture content, Levlose (fructose sugars) levels, and Dextrose (glucose sugars) levels. The honey color is always graded with a number. A low number indicates a light color and the higher the number the darker the honey. Granulation is also given a number value to rate at which point the honey tends to crystallize or granulate. Levlose, dextrose and moisture levels are based on a percentage.

Honey that is sold as raw contains all the pollen, enzymes and other micronutrients that are usually filtered out or destroyed by heat when the honey is processed. Traditionally, honey is heated and filtered so that it will remain liquid much longer. Raw honey will crystalize quickly due to the fact that it is unfiltered. GloryBee offers several varieties of raw honey, which are never heated above 115 degrees. Many people believe that raw honey contains additional health benefits over traditionally processed honey.

Honey has been used for everything from skincare to mead (honey wine). Honey is widely preferred as a sweetener because it is also a flavor enhancer. The wide variety of flavors available from different kinds of honey makes honey a gourmet's delight.

Crystallization of honey

Crystallization is defined as a naturally occurring process of honey that changes it from liquid to solid. Some people think the honey is spoiled as it crystallizes but according to the chart, crystallization in honey occurs when the honey molecules are at optimum temperature. It then begins to crystallize. This has a lot to do with how you store your honey. If you store your honey above 60 degrees Fahrenheit (or in certain containers the optimum is 57 to 58 degrees) it will crystallize. Levulose and dextrose levels affect crystallization also, so typically the one with the higher dextrose will crystallize more quickly; for example, Clover and Alfalfa crystallize more quickly than Orange Blossom or Blackberry. Also, larger quantities will crystallize if they are stored on a concrete floor and the cold temperatures are drawn up into the container. If the honey re-crystallizes very quickly it only means that the honey did not get properly liquefied which means that the sugar crystals did not get dissolved. So if you place your honey in a pan of water and heat it slowly making sure you dissolve all the crystals you can slow crystallization or it will re-crystallize within just a few days.

More Info

Local bee farms recommend us if people need bees to be removed from their property. We save the bees from being extinct by poisons that are used to kill them. 

We remove the colonies free of charge, professional, sustainably and resettle the colonies to safe habitats. In order for us to be able to do this, we have to set up beehives, using exclusively Flow Bee Hives, in which the bees are resettled. Each apiary costs approximately 300USD. 

We do not receive any public support for our work, our clients will never ever receive an invoice from us which is why we are dependent on donations. 

Are you wondering why we do not charge for bee removal? Well, most people simply have no money to pay for the removal of the bees, which is why they are forced to take the easiest option, killing the bees with poisons. Killing bees means we all are losing!

We bear the costs for the care of the bees as well as for the harvest of the honey. We donate the honey, unfortunately, we are not allowed to market the honey commercially, because we need permits for this, which in turn require a commercial operation of the beekeeping, at the expense of the bees, would presuppose. Please help us and with it the bees and, in the long run, humanity, your families, because the bees are primarily responsible for the pollination of the plants that are required for the nutrition of humanity, the food we all eat!

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Uwe Rusch posted a new update:
6 months ago

Update #15

What is Honey?

Honey is a supersaturated sugar solution with approximately 17.1 percent water. Fructose is the predominant sugar at 38.5 percent, followed by glucose at 31 percent. Disac- charides, trisac -charides and oligosaccharides are present in much smaller quantities.

Honey is a pretty amazing substance and there is a lot more to it than just a sweet-tasting treat. Honey plays a crucial role in the life of a honey bee and can also be very beneficial to the human body. We invite you to learn more about honey and bees and how they can enrich our lives.

HONEY FACTS & NUTRITION

Honey is a pretty amazing substance and there is a lot more to it than just a sweet-tasting treat. Honey plays a crucial role in the life of a honey bee and can also be very beneficial to the human body. I invite you to learn more about honey and bees and how they can enrich our lives.

HONEY FACTS

There are over 25,000 species of bees worldwide.
- An adult worker bee's lifespan is about 45 days during the summer
months.
- A typical Bee colony consists of 30,000 to 60,000 bees.
- Male bees are called "Drones" and they do not have stingers, their only
purpose is to mate with the queen bee.
- A queen bee can sting multiple times without dying.
- 99% of the bee colony is made up of female bees known as worker
bees.
- The average honey bee's wings flap over 183 times per second.
- Bees have an excellent sense of smell which allows them to find their
hive.
- Honey Bees actually dance when they return to the hive to tell the
other bees where the flowers are.
- Honey is the ONLY food source produced by an insect that humans
eat.
- Worker honey bees transform the floral nectar the gather into honey
by adding enzymes to the nectar and reducing the moisture.

Honey is a supersaturated sugar solution with approximately 17.1 percent water. Fructose is the predominant sugar at 38.5 percent, followed by glucose at 31 percent. Disac- charides, trisac -charides and oligosaccharides are present in much smaller quantities. Besides carbohydrates, honey contains small amounts of protein, enzymes, vitamins, and minerals. Honey is known to be rich in both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, including catalase, ascorbic acid, flavonoids, and alkaloids. Although appearing only in trace amounts honey also contains about 18 different amino acids.

Each variety of honey has characteristics that make that each one unique. Some of the main characteristics are color, granulation, moisture content, Levlose (fructose sugars) levels, and Dextrose (glucose sugars) levels. The honey color is always graded with a number. A low number indicates a light color and the higher the number the darker the honey. Granulation is also given a number value to rate at which point the honey tends to crystallize or granulate. Levlose, dextrose and moisture levels are based on a percentage.

Honey that is sold as raw contains all the pollen, enzymes and other micronutrients that are usually filtered out or destroyed by heat when the honey is processed. Traditionally, honey is heated and filtered so that it will remain liquid much longer. Raw honey will crystalize quickly due to the fact that it is unfiltered. GloryBee offers several varieties of raw honey, which are never heated above 115 degrees. Many people believe that raw honey contains additional health benefits over traditionally processed honey.

Honey has been used for everything from skincare to mead (honey wine). Honey is widely preferred as a sweetener because it is also a flavor enhancer. The wide variety of flavors available from different kinds of honey makes honey a gourmet's delight.

Crystallization of honey

Crystallization is defined as a naturally occurring process of honey that changes it from liquid to solid. Some people think the honey is spoiled as it crystallizes but according to the chart, crystallization in honey occurs when the honey molecules are at optimum temperature. It then begins to crystallize. This has a lot to do with how you store your honey. If you store your honey above 60 degrees Fahrenheit (or in certain containers the optimum is 57 to 58 degrees) it will crystallize. Levulose and dextrose levels affect crystallization also, so typically the one with the higher dextrose will crystallize more quickly; for example, Clover and Alfalfa crystallize more quickly than Orange Blossom or Blackberry. Also, larger quantities will crystallize if they are stored on a concrete floor and the cold temperatures are drawn up into the container. If the honey re-crystallizes very quickly it only means that the honey did not get properly liquefied which means that the sugar crystals did not get dissolved. So if you place your honey in a pan of water and heat it slowly making sure you dissolve all the crystals you can slow crystallization or it will re-crystallize within just a few days.

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Uwe Rusch posted a new update:
6 months ago

Update #14

MANUKA vs. RAW HONEY

Manuka honey is used as a natural ointment for wounds of all kinds. It has been hailed as a go-to germ fighter in an age of resistance to conventional antibiotics. Proponents also claim that Manuka honey can treat other conditions from acne to sinus issues.

Manuka honey hasn’t been used very long as a traditional remedy. It’s the product of the New Zealand scrub plant that gives it its name. European honey bees introduced it to the area in the early 19th century. When bees pollinate from this plant, their honey is more potent than standard honey bee honey. This is because it has a higher concentration of methylglyoxal (MGO).

What are the benefits of Manuka honey?

When it comes to superfoods, raw honey is associated with health benefits. Manuka isn’t raw honey, but it is specialized. It’s antibacterial and bacterial resistant. This means that bacteria shouldn’t be able to build up a tolerance to its antibacterial effects.

Manuka honey is said to be effective for treating everything from a sore throat to clearing up blemishes on your skin.

Other purported benefits of honey include:

- helping heal cuts and scrapes
- clearing infections
- easing stomach aches
- improving digestion
- boosting the immune system
- providing energy

What the research says

Unlike most alternative treatments, there’s scientific evidence to support the healing benefits of Manuka honey. These benefits include:

Healing wounds

As with other honey, Manuka honey can help heal wounds. All forms of honey are acidic and have a pH between 3.2 and 4.5. The acidic properties of honey have been shown to promote healing.
The acidity also blocks enzymes that break down the proteins and peptides the body needs to repair itself. The high concentration of sugar in honey also helps protect wounds.

Honey is low in moisture and draws the fluid from a wound. This helps remove waste and speed along the healing process. Honey also draws water out of the cells of invading bacteria. Bacteria need water to grow and survive. Drawing the water out of invading bacteria will kill them off.

Antiviral properties

All kinds of honey have been used as natural antibiotics throughout the centuries. In recent years, researchers have discovered that honey’s power to kill germs comes from hydrogen peroxide produced with the help of a bee enzyme.

Manuka honey takes this a step further by attacking germs with a substance called MGO. Found in the nectar of some Manuka plants, this substance helps heal both minor and chronic wounds.
Because of this, the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved bandages infused with Manuka honey for both over-the-counter and prescription sales.

The more MGO there is in the honey, the more antiviral and antibacterial properties it has.

Antibacterial properties

Dozens of species of bacteria are susceptible to Manuka honey, including Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus. Manuka also appears to be effective against "Clostridium Difficile", a difficult to treat organism often spread in healthcare settings.

Researchers are particularly interested in the fact that Manuka honey appears to attack infections that form a biofilm, or a thin, slippery layer of bacteria. This is because once an infection has formed a biofilm, it’s considered to be untreatable.

To date, there are no reports of microbial resistance to honey. That suggests it might be successful against resistant organisms and long-lasting wound infections that do not heal with regular antibiotic therapy. For this reason, honey is considered a last-resort option against infection.

How to use Manuka honey

Manuka honey manufacturers label their product with a unique Manuka factor (UMF) rating. This number describes the levels of MGO and a precursor, dihydroxyacetone.

The range for UMF scoring is as follows:

- 0 to 4: an undetectable amount is present
- 5 to 9: low levels are present
- 10 to 15: useful levels are present
- 16: superior, high-grade levels are present

The higher the UMF number, the higher the level of these compounds. To get the most benefit, use a Manuka honey with a high UMF.

Skincare

Manuka honey, as other honey, may be able to reduce inflammation and irritation associated with acne. To do this, apply Manuka honey directly to the skin. Be sure to cover the affected area with a thin layer of honey.

You should leave this mask on for at least 15 minutes. You may have better results if you leave the mask on for one hour or more.
You may also be able to use Manuka honey to soothe eczema.

According to research, you may find success using a mixture of equal parts of honey, olive oil, and beeswax. It’s recommended that you apply the mixture three times a day.

Digestion and immunology

To reap the digestive benefits of Manuka honey, you should eat 1 to 2 tablespoons of it each day. You can eat it straight or add it to your food.
If you’d like to work Manuka honey into your meal plan, consider spreading it onto a slice of whole-grain toast or adding it to yogurt. Tea drinkers can also add a spoonful to their morning cup.

If you have a sore throat or if you just want to be proactive, try taking 1/2 to 1 tablespoon of Manuka honey each day. If you aren’t sick, this may help boost your immune system and prevent you from getting sick. If you already have a sore throat, it can help ease your symptoms.

Wound care

You may be able to treat minor scrapes and cuts with Manuka honey. Severe or deep cuts should be assessed by your doctor, as stitches or other antibiotic care may be necessary.

You should be able to determine the amount of honey necessary by assessing the amount of fluids leaking from the wound. The more leakage, the more honey you should use to dress the area.
To do this, apply the honey to a bandage. Then apply the bandage to the wound. You shouldn’t apply the honey directly to the wound.
Also, you may need to change the bandage and apply honey more frequently. This is because excessive leakage can dilute the honey and reduce its effects.

Using sealed or waterproof dressing may help keep the honey from spreading outside of the bandaged area.

Risks and warnings

For most people, Manuka honey is safe to consume. There’s usually no limit on how much Manuka honey you can ingest. But if you have diabetes, talk to your doctor before adding Manuka honey to your regimen. Manuka honey, as with other honey, has high sugar content. This may cause a spike in your blood sugar levels.

Some researchers are also questioning whether Manuka honey slows the healing of chronic wounds in people with diabetes. This is because when used alone MGO is toxic to living cells. There are numerous reports of successful chronic wound treatment with Manuka honey, however. But more research is needed.

If you’re allergic to other types of honey, consult your doctor. You likely will not be able to use Manuka honey without experiencing an allergic reaction.

What to look for when buying Manuka honey

Manuka honey is widely available online and in some health food stores. When making your purchase, it’s important to understand exactly what you’re getting — not all Manuka honey is the same.

This type of honey is often labeled as “active Manuka honey,” which can be misleading. This term refers to the antibacterial effects produced by hydrogen peroxide. These antibacterial effects are found in all types of honey.

To guarantee the unique healing properties of Manuka honey, look for a reference to “non-peroxide antibacterial activity (NPA),” or a UMF rating. The UMF rating measures the amount of NPA present in the honey.
Also stick to brands that contain MGO, the unique antibacterial factor in Manuka honey. The more MGO, the better.

In the USA Manuka honey is highly overpriced and it is not worth it to invest in that high priced product.

My recommendation:

BUY LOCAL RAW HONEY and you will enjoy almost the same benefits consuming daily one tablespoon, and if infused with Turmeric, it is much, much better and health efficient.

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Uwe Rusch posted a new update:
6 months ago

Update #13

Turmeric infused honey from Beeswild

Turmeric and Honey: Two powerful antibiotics even doctors can't explain.

Turmeric and honey - The most potent antibiotic

Since ages, Indian spices have been used as a medicine to cure several ailments. Indian spices have for long been used as medicines. Right from burns to minor cuts, turmeric was used as an instant remedy to treat such issues. This was simply because of the miraculous properties of turmeric.

From a common cold to sore throat both honey and turmeric are very potent and important alternatives to conventional medicines because of their benefits and antibiotic properties! In fact, these two wonder ingredients are easily and most affordable items to be used as medicines, honey and turmeric would be it! Honey and turmeric both are used for a variety of problems like cold, digestive issues, cuts, wounds, muscles and sprains along with many other health and skin issues.

I am not even joking when I say, the majority of your health problems have turmeric and honey as their solution!

They have been used intensely in Ayurvedic, Indian and Chinese medicines for thousands of years.

What makes turmeric so powerful?

Turmeric has a very important compound in it, called the curcuminoids. Just like polyphenol, curcuminoid has several healing properties which makes turmeric so strong that it can fight almost all health issues in one go! It is also a very strong anti-oxidant which is why it is very good for the skin and it contains antiseptic, antibacterial, anti-fungal and anti-inflammatory properties that help it to treat wounds and allergies very easily!

Benefits:

- Reduces inflammation
- Improves digestion
- Reduces pain
- Prevents cancer
- Improves anxiety and depression

What makes honey so powerful?

Honey has the power to fight infections without creating resistant bacterias like modern antibiotics. It is so potent that it should be the first method to be used when fighting infections. Many scientists have claimed that honey is more powerful than most of the conventional antibiotics. Honey can also be used to treat infections, cuts, and wounds by applying them directly. Honey can also be taken orally to treat health problems.

Benefits:

- Honey helps in weight management
- It helps fight allergies
- It helps in fighting diseases
- Helps in healing burns and wounds
- Lowers and balances blood sugar level
- Works as a remedy for cough and cold

How to use natural antibiotics using honey and turmeric?

Many of you must be very confused about using these wonderful items instead of your regular medicines. You should give it a try.

Try Beeswild Turmeric infused honey!

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Uwe Rusch posted a new update:
6 months ago

Update #12

Bees are talking to Each Other

Just like most intelligent animals, bees communicate with each other. They don’t use words as we do or clicks like dolphins, but they do have a highly sophisticated method of communication. Bees need to communicate with each other regarding the location of food, possible new hive sites, and their quality, potential danger, and a variety of other things.

Honey bee communication is about three primary methods they leverage. The first, and easiest to understand, is touch. Bees touch their antennae to identify each other and their feet to measure the size of comb cells. Given this important task, bees are quite fastidious about keeping their antennae clean.

Secondly, bees use pheromones. Each hive has its own unique scent, which allows the bees to identify their family members. The queen produces her own pheromone, which inhibits the other females from laying eggs and draws her brood to her. Certain pheromones are also released if the bees sense danger.

Lastly, bees use the waggle dance. This is the most unique method of communication known to nature, or at least I think so. Using an intricate set of dance steps bees returning from foraging or hive site exploration describe to other bees in the hive the location and quality of these sites. The hive “votes” on the most viable site by the number of bees joining in the dance and the intensity of the dancing itself. In the case of selecting a new hive site, the bees will only relocate when a unanimous decision has been reached.

My favorite resource on the waggle dance is Thomas Seeley’s Honeybee Democracy. It’s a bit technical but immensely interesting. Seeley discusses his study of the waggle dance and how each step translates into a specific meaning. If you’re as fascinated with the hive mind as I am, this book does a wonderful job of explaining it.

Talking to Us

Yes, you read that right. The bees do talk to us. And no, I don’t mean in some metaphysical sense, nor do I mean with words. That buzzing noise we all associate with bees? It changes depending on the bees’ mood. If the bees are feeling threatened or distressed, it increases in intensity and volume. When the bees are calm, it is quieter and slower.

The first thing I do during any hive inspection, or any other time I approach the hive, is listening. If the bees sound “happy,” I know I can proceed without concern. If they sound “angry,” I may elect to return another time. Disturbing already anxious or upset bees is a sure way to get stung. Also, because the fear pheromone smells, to the bees, like bananas, I elect to avoid the fruit during bee season.

And speaking of stings… That is, in fact, another way bees talk to us. Honeybees only sting when they feel threatened. If they perceive that either brood or food may be at risk, they will sting. They’ll warn us first with the changing in buzzing just mentioned, but if we don’t listen, they sting us. Each female bee stings only once and dies as a result. If we heed the warning and retreat, we won’t be stung after that. Honeybees, unlike Africanized bees, don’t chase or follow. Once they know the danger is moving away, the go back to work and gradually calm down.

Summary

Beekeepers who understand the ways bees communicate with each other and with us will likely be more successful and, in my opinion, enjoy the beekeeping experience much more. For me, understanding how they talk to each other makes looking in the hive that much more exciting and fascinating. And understanding how they talk to me means I’m able to interact with them in a way that keeps them happy and me unharmed.

Honey bee communication is on par with much more advanced animals. Certainly, for the insect world, they have the most advanced system of communication I’m aware of. It’s just one of the many reasons I love beekeeping and feel inspired each trip to the apiary. I hope you’ll enjoy it as much as I do.

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Uwe Rusch posted a new update:
6 months ago

Update #11

How to catch a bee swarm

Clip & Lower – For me, according to my experience, the best way to get a swarm in my box is to lower them in. This scenario is usually possible when the bees are hanging from a small branch. I simply clip the branch and lower it into my box. Using a Langstroth or Warre hive, I leave the frames in and place the swarm on top of them.

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Uwe Rusch posted a new update:
6 months ago

Update #10

Why I love bees!

Bees are extraordinary creatures. The more I watch them the more I fall in love with them. I am enchanted and fascinated by their diversity – from the tiny little furrow bees (no bigger than a grain of rice) that nest in old stone walls, to the enormous queen bumblebees that herald the arrival of spring.

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Uwe Rusch posted a new update:
6 months ago

Update #9

What Spring’s Arrival Means to the Honey Bee

Spring is right around the corner. Birds are chirping and temperatures are rising. We know what’s going on around us, but what is going on in the honey bee colony when this exciting new time blooms?

Activities that occur in the colony vary with the seasons, and spring is the most important time of the year for honey bees. The bees have survived the cold winter months by living off their storage of honey from the previous year. They now are in need of a new supply.

The first action of business for the colony as the weather changes is increasing its population in advance of summer’s warmth. Spring is the busiest time of year for the bees, not only because of restocking food but it’s also the season when new colonies are started and established colonies re-emerge.

This is also the queen’s mating and egg production season. The eggs are laid in the individual cells of the hive to form larvae. Within three weeks the colony begins to grow quickly.

When the colony becomes crowded, the queen also increases drone egg-laying for swarming, a natural division of the colony. Because of this, the bees prepare to produce a new queen as well.

As population of the colony expands, so does the number of young bees. This means more worker bees for honey production.

The worker bees in spring are busy with finding food for their colony as soon as the first source of pollen emerges. A worker bee can visit around 2,000 flowers per day. However, due to its capacity for carrying food sources, bees can visit only around 50 to 100 flowers before having to return to the hive to dispose of its supply.

In addition to nectar gathering and pollination, bees also collect water to help regulate the temperature of the hive and liquefy thick or granulated honey from the winter. As the season transitions into summer, the bees will have an abundance of food sources to choose from to provide for the colony.

You can help ease the stress of honey bees in spring by being careful about what you clean out of your garden while waiting for new growth. Dandelions, which are often looked on as a pesky weed, are an extremely important nectar provider. It’s often the honey bee’s first source of food after the long winter. Instead of weeding them, keep them for honey bees until more valuable sources bloom. Besides keeping dandelions, plant flowers native to your region. Honey bees especially love daffodils, sunflowers and honeysuckles.

As spring begins to bloom, so does the honey bee life. Sweet summertime, and honey, is getting even closer.

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Uwe Rusch posted a new update:
6 months ago

Update #8

Bees and springtime

The worker bees in spring are busy with finding food for their colony as soon as the first source of pollen emerges. ... In addition to nectar gathering and pollination, bees also collect water to help regulate the temperature of the hive and liquefy thick or granulated honey from the winter.

La primavera y las abejas

Con el ocaso del invierno los días comienzan a llenarse de luz y acontece la primavera, que significa primer verdor, ha pasado el equinoccio que trae el despertar de la naturaleza y su expansión, los días van siendo progresivamente mas largos y cálidos y las noches más cortas, soplan vientos más suaves que abanican los campos floridos y los pájaros cantan con júbilo, es la estación media, e inspira alegría.

La vida entera parece vibrar en una perfecta conjunción de armonía y color, las aves exhiben sus más bellos plumajes y las plantas crecen con todo su vigor, ha llegado el momento de alimentarse y reproducirse.

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Uwe Rusch posted a new update:
6 months ago

Update #7

How know bees each other?

Of all the odors produced by bees, the hive odor is probably the most important. All the bees—workers, queens, and drones—of a colony carry the hive odor of that colony on their bodies among the hairs. This odor serves as a sign or mark by which all the occupants of a hive 'know' one another.

Como se reconoce las abejas?

Como a los insectos se les recompensaba con un poco de azúcar cuando elegían fotografías de personas, lo que realmente veían eran extrañas flores. Lo importante es saber qué estrategia utilizan para discriminar las caras.

Los insectos, como todos los animales, poseen órganos receptores que les permiten detectar los cambios del medio y responder a los mismos con determinadas actitudes o estados fisiológicos. Pero sin embargo, no todos poseen la capacidad de comunicarse con otros de su misma especie y transmitir esa percepción del medio. Las abejas son insectos sociales y como tales se Comunican entre sí.

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Uwe Rusch posted a new update:
6 months ago

Update #6

There are over 16,000 known species of bees in seven recognized biological families. They are found on every continent except Antarctica, in every habitat on the planet that contains insect-pollinated flowering plants. Some species — including honey bees, bumblebees, and stingless bees — live socially in colonies.

Cuantas especies de abejas existens?

Las abejas son un linaje monofilético dentro de la superfamilia Apoidea, del taxón Anthophila. Existen casi 20.000 especies conocidas de abejas en en mundo y de siete a nueve familias reconocidas, aunque muchas no están descritas y el número real es probablemente más alto.

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Uwe Rusch posted a new update:
6 months ago

Update #5

Why are bees so important for us?

Bees are perfectly adapted to pollinate, helping plants grow, breed and produce food. They do so by transferring pollen between flowering plants and so keep the cycle of life turning. The vast majority of plants we need for food rely on pollination, especially by bees: from almonds and vanilla and apples to squashes.

Porque son las abejas tan importante para nosotros?

De las 100 especies de cultivos que abastecen el 90% de los alimentos del mundo, las abejas polinizan más del 70% de ellos. Además, polinizan más de 25.000 especies de plantas con flores. Sin estos insectos la actividad agrícola prácticamente desaparecería, lo que dejaría a muchas familias sin una fuente de ingresos.

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Uwe Rusch posted a new update:
6 months ago

Update #4

SPring & Bees

Bees are diligent, working without a break. Its springtime and the bees are full of energy. Springtime is arguably the busiest time of the year for both the honey bee and the beekeeper. From the bees' perspective, the activity begins before Spring actually arrives. In late winter, as the days increase in length, the queen will resume laying eggs.

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Uwe Rusch posted a new update:
6 months ago

Update #3

Dear supporters,

today our first colony of bees, which we saved a year ago, has split on and swarmed. We caught them and will release them tomorrow in the Pine Island forest. There you will find your peaceful living space, where you can live and reproduce undisturbed by us humans!

Remark:
When bee colonies are splitting on and swarming then they are very happy as they are healthy and reproduce well.

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Uwe Rusch posted a new update:
6 months ago

Update #1

We save bees from extinction. We remove and resettle the bees free of charge. This is costly due to the fact that we need to buy apiaries, and maintaining the apiaries and colonies. Please, help us!

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