CWIS Radiation Exposure Risk Assessment

CWIS Radiation Exposure Risk Assessment

From Rudolph Ryser

We are conducting a two year Radiation and Toxic Chemical Action Research Risk Assessment to identify sources of radioactivity making native peoples and their neighbors sick. You can help monitor and fund this effort.

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Recent Updates

Update #11

8 months ago

The RADIATION EXPOSURE RISK ASSESSMENT HAS BEGUN A SERIES OF articles under the title of Fourth World under the Nuclear Cloud to help more people understand the magnitude of the radiation exposure in indigenous communities.
We begin a 2nd stage of the study called the Yakama Mortality sub-study that will examine death certificates from 1888 to 2015 to determine whether there is a relationship between the dates nuclear reactors were installed at Hanford and changes in diseases and disorders causing deaths among Yakama people. We hope to begin this phase of the study in June 2016 and complete it by November 2016. We will issue a report to the Yakama Community through the Yakama General Council and the Yakama Tribal Council. Documentation will be stored at the Yakama Library.
WE HAVE A NEW TEAM MEMBER IN Dr. Clifford Trafzer at the University of California -- Riverside. Dr. Trafzer is Wyandot and a noted investigator into native history. He originated the study of Yakama mortality by examining records from 1888 to 1964 and then publishing "Death Stalks the Yakamas" in 1998. This is a report of his findings. We will add to his study by examining death certificates from 1965-2015. We are very proud to have the experienced and knowledgeable Dr. Trafzer join in our Action Project.
Remember, we need your help. If you have friends who might contribute, send them to this page and encourage their support.

More Info

The Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington State, USA is the most contaminated radioactive and toxic chemical waste site of the ten most contaminated sites in the world.

Between 1942 and 2000 the United States government along with the governments of Russia, France, United Kingdom, PR of China, Israel, Pakistan, India, North Korea detonated more than 2,153 nuclear bombs around the world underground, above ground and over open sea resulting in contaminated lands, waters and air--and significant exposures of indigenous peoples. The largest number of these tests were conducted on indigenous peoples' lands in Australia, Cook Islands, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nevada, USA and in Kazakhstan, and northwest China.

The United States government is storing 60% of all radioactive wastes produced from it's bomb tests and nuclear power plant spent fuels at Hanford along the Yakama and Columbia Rivers.

In 1962 Nels Allison of Basin City near the Columbia River in Washington State noticed something was very wrong with his sheep. " The lambs were born without eyes or mouths. Some had legs that had grotesquely grown together; others had no legs at all. Many were stillborn." And then the babies in the community began to get sick.

70 years after the first nuclear bomb detonations people, land, animals, water and the air are still experiencing the results of the "nuclear clouds."  Most formal scientific assessments of risk to people and the land remain incomplete. As Michael D'Antonio in his 1993 book Atomic Harvest, reminds us their are thousands of horror stories that took place in the area surrounding Hanford, Washington, the site of America's first full-scale plutonium production facility. The site haunts the locals to this day -- and imperils them."

We want to change this dynamic with the Center for World Indigenous Studies (CWIS) Radiation Risk Assessment Action Research Project combined with the Radiation Risk Assessment Monitoring Panel. We think that governments have failed to protect people from the consequences of nuclear radiation. We want to take action now.

The Radiation Risk Assessment Monitoring Panel we are forming will include contributors to this project as well as other members of the public interested in taking action. We aren't interested in simply studying the problem of radiation exposure. We want to change the pattern of failure to public involvement directly in solving the problem. The Action Research Risk Assessment will provide the concrete information and the Monitoring Panel will provide the action.

Learn more and join us. www.cwis.org

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Help Rudolph raise $58,145 by making a donation.

Rudolph Ryser posted a new update:
8 months ago

Update #11

The RADIATION EXPOSURE RISK ASSESSMENT HAS BEGUN A SERIES OF articles under the title of Fourth World under the Nuclear Cloud to help more people understand the magnitude of the radiation exposure in indigenous communities.
We begin a 2nd stage of the study called the Yakama Mortality sub-study that will examine death certificates from 1888 to 2015 to determine whether there is a relationship between the dates nuclear reactors were installed at Hanford and changes in diseases and disorders causing deaths among Yakama people. We hope to begin this phase of the study in June 2016 and complete it by November 2016. We will issue a report to the Yakama Community through the Yakama General Council and the Yakama Tribal Council. Documentation will be stored at the Yakama Library.
WE HAVE A NEW TEAM MEMBER IN Dr. Clifford Trafzer at the University of California -- Riverside. Dr. Trafzer is Wyandot and a noted investigator into native history. He originated the study of Yakama mortality by examining records from 1888 to 1964 and then publishing "Death Stalks the Yakamas" in 1998. This is a report of his findings. We will add to his study by examining death certificates from 1965-2015. We are very proud to have the experienced and knowledgeable Dr. Trafzer join in our Action Project.
Remember, we need your help. If you have friends who might contribute, send them to this page and encourage their support.

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Rudolph Ryser posted a new update:
9 months ago

Update #10

Here is the first installment of “Fourth World Under the Nuclear Cloud," a four part series being published by Intercontinental Cry Magazine (intercontinentalcry.org) drawing on preliminary results from the CWIS Radiation Exposure Risk Assessment Action Research Project. Read the first installment at https://intercontinentalcry.org/fourth-world-nuclear-cloud/

I want to encourage you to contribute to the CWIS Radiation Exposure Project by logging on to https://fundly.com/radiation-exposure-risk-assessment We receive no government, foundation or business funds for this project—they won’t contribute. Your help is essential.

Amy Eisenberg commented on a blog post:
8 months ago
Important work! My dear father was deployed to Nagasaki to "mop up" after the US dropped the atomic bomb. He died young.

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Rudolph Ryser posted a new update:
10 months ago

Update #9

We are starting again to raise our initial funding need of $60,000. Won't you help us now?

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Rudolph Ryser posted a new update:
10 months ago

Update #8

WE ARE STILL WORKING, BUT SLOWED FOR LACK OF FUNDS

Our Research Team has been a bit tardy reporting on our activities for the last month or so. We have been engaged in Phase 1, Stage 1 (gathering existing dose reconstruction studies from around the world and radiation/hazardous chemical exposure studies as well. We are focusing on public studies from South Korea, France, United States, and Britain to evaluate how each study was conducted, its findings, whether indigenous population exposures were considered, general exposure results and dose reconstruction methods. The purpose of this Phase 1 Stage 1 effort has been to assess whether past studies reveal consistency, involvement of the same researchers, institutional (government) similarities, and similar or parallel findings and conclusions. Several studies were truncated (not finished) by various governments and we are interested in knowing why.
WE have also be in touch with the Yakama Nation government in an effort to gain access to a "plants, medicines and culture" database as well as our effort to establish an agreement for collaborating with the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program at the Yakama. Our study is wide ranging and the first of its kind -- certainly as concerns an indigenous population. No studies have been conducted anywhere in the world even though six of the ten most toxic radiation and toxic chemical sites are located in indigenous territories. If the Yakama government collaborates we will then be able to better engage Yakama tribal members and other residents on the Yakama Reservation to document exposures through a "longitudinal retrospective" study back to 1944. That is Phase three of the current study. We have not as yet (after two months) heard back from the Yakama government. We are advised that the recent elections now require in February a reorganization of the Council.
The researchers are preparing to write three articles discussing the Radiation Exposure Study to better inform the public about the study and why it is necessary. These articles will be published in March.
We have raised only about $2000 toward our initial needed $60,000 and those funds were used to allow two of our researchers to participate in a meeting on the 10th and 11th of December to discuss the current state of knowledge among ERWM and supporter technicians working under US Department of Energy contracts.
We need to raise a working sum of $450,000 USD to make this project speed up and we need the Yakama Nation government to collaborate with us to speed up the study too. These are serious limitations, but we hope our initial supporters will consider donating more to help out.

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Rudolph Ryser posted a new update:
about 1 year ago

Update #7

We are grateful to those of you who have donated to the CWIS Radiation Exposure Risk Assessment Action Research Project. If you can spare the additional funds, perhaps you will consider donating again.

We are conducting the study completely dependent on individual contributors since in the last thirty years no foundation, government or business in the United States has been willing to provide the needed resources to inquire into the risk of radiation exposure and toxic chemical waste that native peoples are likely to have experienced and will experience along with many thousands of others. We decided to take a proactive course of action to determine the risks and identify the methods of prevention and remedy that may be available or can be developed to protect the various peoples' health.

We have extended our fundraising effort for Phase I of the Action Research Project to encourage more support. Please reach out to your friends, colleagues and partners to urge their contributions to our efforts.

Our research team now includes an environmental health specialist who has conducted dose reconstruction studies and an epidemiologist who offers extensive knowledge about plant medicines as well as the effects of radiation and toxic chemicals on human health. We meet this week to set further priorities for Phase I

Thanks again for your continued support.

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Rudolph Ryser posted a new update:
about 1 year ago

Update #6

We have thirty-eight days before the end of our initial effort to raise support for Phase I of the CWIS Radiation Exposure Risk Assessment Action Research Project. The contributions are slowly trickling in, but they remain below our expectations. We wish to encourage those of you who have already contributed to reach out to your friends and colleagues so they too can contribute.

A report of nuclear waste hidden away in North St Louis County, Missouri (http://www.ksdk.com/news/article/364208/3/North-County-cancer-cluster-investigation) affirms the great importance of our study for indigenous peoples and for people in suburban communities. Report cases of cancer have doubled in that county.

Meanwhile, let me indicate what we have already accomplished in Phase I.

We have begun the arduous task for collecting documentary material from past and present risk assessments at the Hanford Nuclear Waste Site as well as documentary assessments from South Korea and the Marshall Islands. We are reaching out to the government of the Marshall Islands and have the benefit of a referral by the diplomatic representative of the Marshall Islands in Hawaii.

The purpose of this Phase I domain 1 review of previous risk assessments is to learn what the strengths and weaknesses of those assessments have been. We note that the 2015 study conducted by Charles Powers and David Kosson of Vanderbilt University (under a US Department of Energy contract) determined there were four basic choice criteria for locating nuclear waste sites in the United States:

1) the nation would no longer recycle its used, but energy-rich, used (spent) nuclear fuel because, it was believed, that recycling process would promote proliferation of nuclear weapons;

2) management of used fuel would be restricted to burying it permanently and safely in deep geologic repositories – immediately - so that the burden of its management would not be passed onto future generations; and

3) the selection of the specific characteristics and location(s) of the repository(ies) would be based on technical factors and regional equity, not local public acceptance, since, it was believed, no community or state would ever voluntarily support the nearby siting of such facilities (“Not in my back yard”);

4) efficiency dictates that a single repository should host both the civilian and defense wastes, including both spent nuclear fuel and vitrified high level waste, that are to be sent to a geological repository.

We are paying some attention to criteria #3 above since not consulting with local populations that may be affected by radiation and toxic chemical exposures violates the US government's agreement to abide by international agreements prohibiting experimentation on human subjects without their consent: (Medical or scientific experimentation. The United States Constitution constrains the government‘s power to use individuals in non-consensual experimentation, including non-consensual medical treatment and experimentation. Specifically, the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments proscribe deprivation of life, liberty or property without due process of law.)

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Rudolph Ryser posted a new update:
about 1 year ago

Update #5

Thanks to our initial donors we have received 3% of the funds we need to conduct Phase 1 of the CWIS Radiation Exposure Risk Assessment Action Research Project. We hope you will consider making a contribution.

HERE IS AN UPDATE:

1. The Project started up on 23 September and we have quickly advanced to begin development of historical data in six domains: Records of prior Risk Assessments, 134 companies involved in radiation waste management at Hanford, survey of land, water, plants and animals in the columbia river basin as sources of risk, native peoples' cultures and radiation risk in the Columbia River Basin, former risk assessment methodologies, survey of indigenous peoples world-wide at potential risk of radiation and toxic chemical exposure,

2. We are now reaching out to indigenous nations in the US, Pacific Region, Australia, Kazakhstan, Kirghizia, Northern Russia and Scandinavia seeking their collaboration on this Action Research Project.

3. Begun exploring natural foods and medicines that may prevent or mitigate radiation and toxic chemical exposure risks.

4. Organizing research team made up of Janna Lafferty (Researcher), Russell Jim, (supervisor) Dr. Rudolph Ryser (Principal Investigator), and Yvonne Sherwood (Co-Researcher) [See Photo: from left to right] met on 16 October near the Hanford site to discuss investigation strategies for Phase I, formalizing collaboration, incorporating other researchers.

We hope you will join this important project by making a donation now.

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Rudolph Ryser posted a new update:
about 1 year ago

Update #4

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provided support for a study that cost $33 million that estimated radiation dose estimates from "Hanford Radioactive Material Releases to the Air and the Columbia River. The study results that found significant adverse exposures to people, plants, land, water and animals was produced on April 21, 1994. The six year study was set aside as unacceptable by the US Department of Energy yet the study stands as the only formal US inquiry into radiation exposures from Hanford. This is why we are undertaking to conduct an independent Action Research study with your help. Here is what the 1994 Study stated in its study summary about its findings:

"Public concern about past Hanford operations led the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) in 1986 to release thousands of pages of documents. These documents detailed some of Hanford’s operating history and showed that there were past off-site releases of radioactive material.

Washington, Oregon, and regional Native American Tribes gathered an independent panel of experts-called the Hanford Health Effects Review Panel-to evaluate this information- They found that the releases to the air in the 1940s and early 1950s. and releases to the river up until 1971, exposed people in the region to radioactive materials. Many people in the region fear these releases caused a variety of health problems.

In September 1986, the Health Effects Review Panel recommended dose reconstruction and thyroid health effects feasibility studies.

In response, USDOE directed Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory to conduct the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. The project was to determine how much radioactive material was released, how that material may have reached and exposed people, and most importantly, what radiation dose people may have received." (Technical Steering Panel 1994, p. 3)

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Rudolph Ryser posted a new update:
about 1 year ago

Update #3

The CWIS Radiation Exposure Risk Assessment Action Research Project began initial organization on 23 September. We are grateful to those who have already made contributions to the project. Here is a brief outline of how the project is being put together:

Phase 1: Planning and Literature Investigations, Radiation Risk Assessment Monitoring Panel organization
Goals in this Phase:
[ ] Initiate Fundraising
[x] Form Tentative research team members list (Checked are confirmed):
[x] Dr. Rudolph Ryser, PhD, Principle Investigator
[x] To be determined: Co Principal, Epidemiologist (invitation sent)
[x] Dr. Leslie E. Korn, PhD, Senior Researcher, Behavioral Medicine, Medical Humanities and Public Health
[ ] To Be Determined Senior Researcher, Environmental Health (invitation sent)
[x] Russell Jim, Research Advisor

[x] Yvonne Sherwood, MA, Co-Researcher (Social Research, Community Organization, Cultural Survey,
[x] Janna Lafferty, MA, Researcher
[x] Susan McCaferty, MA, Researcher
[x] Dina Gilio-Whitaker, MA, Researcher
[x] Heidi G. Bruce, MA, Researcher
[ ] Collate record of previous US government Radiation Risk Assessments affecting People and Land
[ ] Document the role and radiation releases of prime and secondary Radiation Waste Management contractors from 1942 - present
[ ] Collate existing data on plants, animals, soils, water and human exposures from 1942 - present
[ ] Describe cultural relationships between Columbia River Basin native peoples with the land and other life in the region from 1942 - present
[ ] Formalize research methodologies for Risk Assessment, Dose Reconstruction, and historical validation.
Phase 2: Organization of Research Teams, Community Groups, etc
Phase 3: Conduct Research
Phase 4: Data analysis and evaluation
Phase 5: Conclusions and Findings
Monitoring reports will be issued to the Radiation Risk Assessment Monitoring Panel for Action (RRAMPA) as the project proceeds along with Web conferences with key researchers.

We need many more contributors since we are now only 1/60th of the level we need to establish our initial funding goal of $60,000. Please contact your friends and make a donation yourself. In the US it is a tax deductible contribution. If you need more information about CWIS check into our website at www.cwis.org

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Rudolph Ryser posted a new update:
about 1 year ago

Update #2

Thank you for your generous donation to the CWIS Radiation Exposure Risk Assessment Action Research Project. Maybe your friends are also interested in supporting our project. Use this URL to give them a chance to support us: https://fundly.com/radiation-exposure-risk-assessment

We have begun Phase One of the Project focusing on compiling the records (public and private) from 1942 to the present about nuclear radiation and toxic chemical releases including those from waste storage facilities. Records will include identification of families so expose as a result of breathing the air, consuming native plants, fish, birds and other animals and walking on the soil.

No studies designed to examine the transmission of inter-generational genetic mutations that could result in health problems several generations after the first exposure have be conducted. No studies have been conducted incorporating cultural factors. As a result, it may be that even though initial exposures began in the early 1940s, the effects of those exposures may continue to the present.

We will keep you up to date as the CWIS Radiation Exposure Risk Assessment Action Research Project proceeds.

Thank you again for your support and perhaps you will consider posting our fundraising URL (https://fundly.com/radiation-exposure-risk-assessment) on your Facebook Page or include it in emails to your friends on the chance they may want to join in this effort.

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Rudolph Ryser posted a new update:
about 1 year ago

Update #1

We have just begun planning for the CWIS Radiation Risk Assessment Action Research Study. Yvonne Sherwood our co researcher will join the project on 24 September.

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