Menstrual hygiene

Menstrual hygiene

From Ayowecca Uganda

To train 6000 young Adolescents, girls and youths on how to make and use Reusable sanitary pads so as to keep at school and maintain hygiene during thier menstruation days. Girls in rural schools miss school these days

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Update #2

3 months ago

MENSTRUAL HYGIENE
Many of the girls at primary schools find it hard to attend school during their menstrual days, simply because of fear that boys or fellow school mates will laugh at them when blood has dirtten their school uniform, most of which come from a very poor background that their parents cannot afford sanitary towels for their children at the same time look for the little to feed the family. Girls face all these because of lack of parental care and lesson on menstrual hygiene at home.
Most African homes/families live below the poverty line that they can’t even use a dollar for their daily expenditure. Our project of re-useable sanitary management is to equip girls with knowledge on how they can make their own sanitary pads to keep them at school and keep hygiene within themselves without fear.
Pubescent girls in Africa are confronted with diverse Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) challenges, especially at school. Girls from rural pastoralist and other communities experience insurmountable MHM barriers. Inadequate coping strategies adopted result in sub-optimal school performance, absenteeism and physical problems. We conducted a study to assess MHM practices among primary school girls from a pastoralist and other different communities in Uganda.
Across sectional survey was done among primary school girls in Moroto county, Uganda per parish Accent was sought, we administered structured questionnaires which sought information on socio-demographics, knowledge, perceptions and practices. We enrolled 320 girls with mean age of 14.9 years. Their parents were mostly (69.4%) self employed pastoralists. Good menstruation knowledge was observed in 51.6% while 45.5% reported diverse perceptions about menstruation. Majority (80.9%) used sanitary towels as absorbents, but 40.3%delayed changing by >6 hours. Poor MHM practices were documented in 28.8% and 32.2% kept the issue secret.
Factors associate with poor MHM practices on unviable analysis were age, religion, non discussions, lack of sanitary pads, lack of latrine privacy, lack of water and teasing by boys. On logistic regression, factors that independently influenced poor MHM practices were inadequate latrine privacy and fear of teasing by boys.
Pubescent girls in African countries especially those from rural settings face diverse “Menstrual Hygiene Management” MHM challenges. Many rural schools are not attuned girls menstruating needs.
Girl’s pastoralist communities and other areas face insurmountable MHM barriers. MHM is defined as a use of clean menstrual materials to absorb or collect blood that can be changed in privacy as often as necessary for the duration of menstruation, using soap and water for washing the body as required and having facilities to dispose off used menstrual management materials.
Unfortunately, many rural schools have inadequate water, sanitation and hygiene facilities (WASH) for girls. According to the survey, school latrine coverage stood at 49.5%. Many schools lack clean and private changing rooms. Many girls cannot access or afford appropriate absorbent materials and often resort to crude methods. Besides, menstruation is surrounded by divergent religion beliefs and cultural perceptions that impact on MHM practices. It is considered a taboo by various communities and even by the teachers; hence they do not provide information and guidance on the meaning and management of menses.
Unable to cope with this physiological process and to avoid suffering, shame, girls adopt to diverse coping strategies that vary across regions, based on personal preferences, resources available, knowledge and cultural beliefs. This affects their rights, social and mental well being, resulting in sub-optimal school performance, school absenteeism and dropout. On average, adolescent girls miss at least 6 weeks of school per year due to menses.
Further to many suffer diverse reproductive health problems, especially urogenital infections arising from unsafe, unhygienic practices. This has worsened existing gender disparities observed across regions on access, retention, transition and achievements on education.
I therefore argue you to join our movement to help millions of girl children out there who are facing these challenges to help them stay at school please contact us on donations@ayoweccauganda.org for any contributions. Thank you.

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Ayowecca Uganda posted a new update:
3 months ago

Update #2

MENSTRUAL HYGIENE
Many of the girls at primary schools find it hard to attend school during their menstrual days, simply because of fear that boys or fellow school mates will laugh at them when blood has dirtten their school uniform, most of which come from a very poor background that their parents cannot afford sanitary towels for their children at the same time look for the little to feed the family. Girls face all these because of lack of parental care and lesson on menstrual hygiene at home.
Most African homes/families live below the poverty line that they can’t even use a dollar for their daily expenditure. Our project of re-useable sanitary management is to equip girls with knowledge on how they can make their own sanitary pads to keep them at school and keep hygiene within themselves without fear.
Pubescent girls in Africa are confronted with diverse Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) challenges, especially at school. Girls from rural pastoralist and other communities experience insurmountable MHM barriers. Inadequate coping strategies adopted result in sub-optimal school performance, absenteeism and physical problems. We conducted a study to assess MHM practices among primary school girls from a pastoralist and other different communities in Uganda.
Across sectional survey was done among primary school girls in Moroto county, Uganda per parish Accent was sought, we administered structured questionnaires which sought information on socio-demographics, knowledge, perceptions and practices. We enrolled 320 girls with mean age of 14.9 years. Their parents were mostly (69.4%) self employed pastoralists. Good menstruation knowledge was observed in 51.6% while 45.5% reported diverse perceptions about menstruation. Majority (80.9%) used sanitary towels as absorbents, but 40.3%delayed changing by >6 hours. Poor MHM practices were documented in 28.8% and 32.2% kept the issue secret.
Factors associate with poor MHM practices on unviable analysis were age, religion, non discussions, lack of sanitary pads, lack of latrine privacy, lack of water and teasing by boys. On logistic regression, factors that independently influenced poor MHM practices were inadequate latrine privacy and fear of teasing by boys.
Pubescent girls in African countries especially those from rural settings face diverse “Menstrual Hygiene Management” MHM challenges. Many rural schools are not attuned girls menstruating needs.
Girl’s pastoralist communities and other areas face insurmountable MHM barriers. MHM is defined as a use of clean menstrual materials to absorb or collect blood that can be changed in privacy as often as necessary for the duration of menstruation, using soap and water for washing the body as required and having facilities to dispose off used menstrual management materials.
Unfortunately, many rural schools have inadequate water, sanitation and hygiene facilities (WASH) for girls. According to the survey, school latrine coverage stood at 49.5%. Many schools lack clean and private changing rooms. Many girls cannot access or afford appropriate absorbent materials and often resort to crude methods. Besides, menstruation is surrounded by divergent religion beliefs and cultural perceptions that impact on MHM practices. It is considered a taboo by various communities and even by the teachers; hence they do not provide information and guidance on the meaning and management of menses.
Unable to cope with this physiological process and to avoid suffering, shame, girls adopt to diverse coping strategies that vary across regions, based on personal preferences, resources available, knowledge and cultural beliefs. This affects their rights, social and mental well being, resulting in sub-optimal school performance, school absenteeism and dropout. On average, adolescent girls miss at least 6 weeks of school per year due to menses.
Further to many suffer diverse reproductive health problems, especially urogenital infections arising from unsafe, unhygienic practices. This has worsened existing gender disparities observed across regions on access, retention, transition and achievements on education.
I therefore argue you to join our movement to help millions of girl children out there who are facing these challenges to help them stay at school please contact us on donations@ayoweccauganda.org for any contributions. Thank you.

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Ayowecca Uganda posted a new update:
3 months ago

Update #1

menstrual hygiene
Many of the girls at primary schools find it hard to attend school during their menstrual days, simply because of fear that boys or fellow school mates will laugh at them when blood has dirtten their school uniform, most of which come from a very poor background that their parents cannot afford sanitary towels for their children at the same time look for the little to feed the family. Girls face all these because of lack of parental care and lesson on menstrual hygiene at home.
Most African homes/families live below the poverty line that they can’t even use a dollar for their daily expenditure. Our project of re-useable sanitary management is to equip girls with knowledge on how they can make their own sanitary pads to keep them at school and keep hygiene within themselves without fear.
Pubescent girls in Africa are confronted with diverse Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) challenges, especially at school. Girls from rural pastoralist and other communities experience insurmountable MHM barriers. Inadequate coping strategies adopted result in sub-optimal school performance, absenteeism and physical problems. We conducted a study to assess MHM practices among primary school girls from a pastoralist and other different communities in Uganda.
Across sectional survey was done among primary school girls in Moroto county, Uganda per parish Accent was sought, we administered structured questionnaires which sought information on socio-demographics, knowledge, perceptions and practices. We enrolled 320 girls with mean age of 14.9 years. Their parents were mostly (69.4%) self employed pastoralists. Good menstruation knowledge was observed in 51.6% while 45.5% reported diverse perceptions about menstruation. Majority (80.9%) used sanitary towels as absorbents, but 40.3%delayed changing by >6 hours. Poor MHM practices were documented in 28.8% and 32.2% kept the issue secret.
Factors associate with poor MHM practices on unviable analysis were age, religion, non discussions, lack of sanitary pads, lack of latrine privacy, lack of water and teasing by boys. On logistic regression, factors that independently influenced poor MHM practices were inadequate latrine privacy and fear of teasing by boys.
Pubescent girls in African countries especially those from rural settings face diverse “Menstrual Hygiene Management” MHM challenges. Many rural schools are not attuned girls menstruating needs.
Girl’s pastoralist communities and other areas face insurmountable MHM barriers. MHM is defined as a use of clean menstrual materials to absorb or collect blood that can be changed in privacy as often as necessary for the duration of menstruation, using soap and water for washing the body as required and having facilities to dispose off used menstrual management materials.
Unfortunately, many rural schools have inadequate water, sanitation and hygiene facilities (WASH) for girls. According to the survey, school latrine coverage stood at 49.5%. Many schools lack clean and private changing rooms. Many girls cannot access or afford appropriate absorbent materials and often resort to crude methods. Besides, menstruation is surrounded by divergent religion beliefs and cultural perceptions that impact on MHM practices. It is considered a taboo by various communities and even by the teachers; hence they do not provide information and guidance on the meaning and management of menses.
Unable to cope with this physiological process and to avoid suffering, shame, girls adopt to diverse coping strategies that vary across regions, based on personal preferences, resources available, knowledge and cultural beliefs. This affects their rights, social and mental well being, resulting in sub-optimal school performance, school absenteeism and dropout. On average, adolescent girls miss at least 6 weeks of school per year due to menses.
Further to many suffer diverse reproductive health problems, especially urogenital infections arising from unsafe, unhygienic practices. This has worsened existing gender disparities observed across regions on access, retention, transition and achievements on education.
I therefore argue you to join our movement to help millions of girl children out there who are facing these challenges to help them stay at school.

Join the Conversation

Sign in with your Facebook account or