HELP MAGGIE BEAT FIP

HELP MAGGIE BEAT FIP

From Linda Selsmeyer

Up until recently, there was NO cure for FIP. Treatment is NOW available. Maggie has begun treatment and is responding fantastically. PurrHarmony Inc is needing to raise $4,500 for her 84 days of medicine and lab work.

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Update #2

over 1 year ago

Our little Maggie is growing up! She now weighs over 5 pounds, which means she needs to take two pills a day, instead of one. It is extremely important that we increase her anti-viral medicine proportionately to her weight or we risk the real possibility of her relapsing to FIP and we certainly DO NOT WANT THAT! Maggie doesn't even know she's sick anymore, but we know, through the clinical trials of Dr. Niels Pedersen, that the virus is still within her little body, so we must complete all 84 days of treatment.

In order to spread out the cost to PurrHarmony, we order 10 days at a time, which with shipping, is almost exactly $450.00. The total estimated cost for the remaining treatment at her current weight (which will go up) is $1,530.00 with another vet visit in ten days and a final visit at completion, which will be $250.00.

The good news is treatment is WORKING and your dollars are getting 100% positive results! Just look at the light in her eyes!

Please share this post so that people far and wide know that there is a cure for FIP!

More Info

Warrior—a noun that refers to a soldier involved in a fight. Used to describe someone or something who is very strong and does not give up easily.

Maggie is a warrior. Her story began in August when she landed in a county shelter orphaned at only five weeks old and sick. Staff rallied around to provide her with care, medications and love to help her tiny body survive and Maggie fought with them. 

The darkness continued to surround her as she presented neurological symptoms that many thought were consistent with cerebellar hypoplasia (CH). Wobbling, falling, unable to run, jump or navigate, Maggie was put into foster care for further assessment. CH is not usually life threatening but would require a special environment and knowledge to keep her safe.  Maggie’s symptoms continued to bother her foster mom who was not convinced of the CH diagnosis and dug deeper. Research led her to acquire more testing for this wee kitten.  

Maggie the Warrior’s fight was just beginning.

Toxoplasmosis is an infection most often found in the young, the weak, the immunocompromised. Maggie did not have CH. Diagnosed with toxoplasmosis was not a welcomed outcome. However, it is treatable with varying levels of recovery. Maggie faithfully took her daily medication for EIGHT WEEKS while receiving physical therapy and stimulation from her foster mom and her beloved foster brother. She relearned how to walk several steps at a time; she discovered surfaces that helped her stay on her feet; she followed her foster brother and the feather toy. She fought despite starting from scratch. Ferocious, happy, determined … Maggie moves more slowly and doesn’t jump much, but she can scratch a post and play with toys. She had fought a really good fight and she won. 

No one saw the ambush coming.  

This now 5-month-old kitten had yet to experience the worst. The keen observations of her foster mom caused her to puzzle over Maggie’s swelling belly. Although she had been treated multiple times for worms and parasites, tests revealed there were more. So, she was treated again. And the belly grew. Urgency heightened. Then came the diagnosis. No one in the cat world ever wants to hear FIP (feline infectious peritonitis). NO ONE. FIP comes with a death sentence — a painful, incurable disease. 

Had the warrior met her match? Would Maggie and her small army of faithful caregivers hang their heads in defeat? 

Up until recently there was no treatment or cure. Research continues and experimental trials have found a light and glimmer of hope. But, in the early stages of discovery, the medications are difficult to acquire, require significant monitoring by skilled veterinarians willing to be flexible and are nearly cost prohibitive. The daily treatment is a mandatory 84 days (12 weeks). Then another 12 weeks of monitoring is required to declare victory. The cure rate is a whopping 95%!

This is a battle only for a warrior. Maggie IS that warrior and now she needs an army. She needs her army to share her story, to advocate for approval of the treatment for all afflicted and to support lowering the costs so all have a chance to be saved. Maggie’s medication will cost approximately $4,000 and her lab work approximately another $500.  Please join her army. A warrior should not fight alone. 

As of 12/26/2020 Maggie was transferred from the Porter County Shelter to PurrHarmony Purebred Cat Rescue for continued medical care and future adoption. Maggie will continue being fostered with her current foster family.

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Linda Selsmeyer posted a new update:
over 1 year ago

Update #2

Our little Maggie is growing up! She now weighs over 5 pounds, which means she needs to take two pills a day, instead of one. It is extremely important that we increase her anti-viral medicine proportionately to her weight or we risk the real possibility of her relapsing to FIP and we certainly DO NOT WANT THAT! Maggie doesn't even know she's sick anymore, but we know, through the clinical trials of Dr. Niels Pedersen, that the virus is still within her little body, so we must complete all 84 days of treatment.

In order to spread out the cost to PurrHarmony, we order 10 days at a time, which with shipping, is almost exactly $450.00. The total estimated cost for the remaining treatment at her current weight (which will go up) is $1,530.00 with another vet visit in ten days and a final visit at completion, which will be $250.00.

The good news is treatment is WORKING and your dollars are getting 100% positive results! Just look at the light in her eyes!

Please share this post so that people far and wide know that there is a cure for FIP!

Join the Conversation

Sign in with your Facebook account or

Linda Selsmeyer posted a new update:
over 1 year ago

Update #1

TREATMENT IS WORKING!!! YOUR DOLLARS ARE WORKING!
Maggs has the Wet form of FIP. That means she accumulated fluid in her abdomen causing the huge bloated belly, but it can accumulate in the lungs or kidneys as well. If the anti-viral treatment is working, those fluids dissipate within, on average, the first 8-10 days, bringing MUCH relief to the cat. Maggie had her first vet visit yesterday (1/22/21) since starting treatment and the results of her ultrasound astonished her vet doctors. Her little body was free from abdominal fluid! This is her first big milestone to being cured. Blood work was also collected because there are distinct blood markers to look for in active fip infections, such as low albumin, high globulin, high white blood cell count, low red blood cell count, high neutrophils, high protein, and high bilirubin. We will share those results as soon as we hear! Thank you for your support! Maggie deserves a chance to live and this is the only avenue to do that!

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