#givingtuesday

#givingtuesday

From Crystal Mitchell

To provide housing for seniors with physical & mental disabilities, victims of domestic abuse, homeless, or ex-offenders: 4 home health care, transportation, counseling 4 successful re-entry into the community.

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Update #4

9 months ago

Ways That Giving is Good for the Donor
Post 2 of a series of 5

Giving is Good For Our Mental and Physical Health

As we mature from childhood to adulthood we find that giving a gift becomes more satisfying than receiving a gift. Why? The look of pure joy on the face of the recipient of the gift as he or she unwraps what we gave is sufficient reward for the giver. Many of us are far more endowed by God with resources greater than those of others around us.

Awareness of our blessing creates the desire within us to help make a difference to make our communities and the world a better place. When we give we enrich our lives as well as the lives of the persons that our gift helps (Haltiwanger, 2014). Winston Churchill said, “We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give.”

Stony Brook University medicine study found that giving to others extends health benefits to chronically ill patients including those with HIV and Multiple Sclerosis (Post, 2007). Johns Hopkins University and the University of Tennessee collaborative study found that people who provide social support to others had lower blood pressure, thus improving health and longevity by stress reduction (Piferi and Lawler, 2006). University of California-Riverside found that happiness produced by giving to others is one of the most significant dimensions of human experience and emotional life (Lyubomirsky, 2019) University of California Berkley found that seniors who volunteer for two or three days per week are 44% less likely to die over a five-year period (even those with poor exercise habits, general health concerns, and negative habits, such as smoking (Oman, Thoreson, and McMahon, 1999). University of Michigan study found extended life benefits to seniors who provided volunteer and emotional support to help to friends, family, neighbors, and their spouses had a reduced risk of dying over a five year period of time (Brown, Nesse, Vinokur, and Smith, 2003).

Taken together these study findings are supported by the promise of God found in Psalm 41:1-3, that if we “consider the poor, that in the day of our trouble the Lord will deliver us” and raise us up from our sickbed. Matthew 10:42 summarized tells us that a relationship exists between how we treat the poor, needy, and vulnerable around us and our future reward. The Lord keeps intricate account records even to the detail of a cup of water given in his name (Mark 9:41). Proverbs 19:17 promises us that when we give to the poor that we are lending to God and that He will repay us for this act of faith

Citations

Brown, S. Nesse, R., Vinokur, A., Smith, D. (2003). Providing Social Support May Be
More Beneficial Than Receiving It: Results from a Prospective Study of Mortality
Accessed [Online] https://www.psychologicalscience.org/pdf/14_4Brown.cfm

Haltiwanger, J. (2014). The Science of Generosity: Why Giving Makes You So Happy. Accessed [Online} https://www.elitedaily.com/l…/science-generosity-feels-good-
give/890500

Lyubomirsky, S. (2019). Sonja Lyubomirsky Website. Accessed [Online]
http://sonjalyubomirsky.com/

Oman, D., Thoreson, C., and McMahon, K. (1999). Volunteerism and Mortality Among
the Community-Dwelling Elderly. Accessed [Online] https://journals.sagepub.com/…/a…/10.1177/135910539900400301

Piferi, R., and Lawler, K. (2006). Social Support and Ambulatory Blood Pressure: An
Examination of Both Receiving and Giving Accessed [Online] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16905215

#giving #givingtuesday #fundraising #benefits

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Crystal Mitchell posted a new update:
9 months ago

Update #4

Ways That Giving is Good for the Donor
Post 2 of a series of 5

Giving is Good For Our Mental and Physical Health

As we mature from childhood to adulthood we find that giving a gift becomes more satisfying than receiving a gift. Why? The look of pure joy on the face of the recipient of the gift as he or she unwraps what we gave is sufficient reward for the giver. Many of us are far more endowed by God with resources greater than those of others around us.

Awareness of our blessing creates the desire within us to help make a difference to make our communities and the world a better place. When we give we enrich our lives as well as the lives of the persons that our gift helps (Haltiwanger, 2014). Winston Churchill said, “We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give.”

Stony Brook University medicine study found that giving to others extends health benefits to chronically ill patients including those with HIV and Multiple Sclerosis (Post, 2007). Johns Hopkins University and the University of Tennessee collaborative study found that people who provide social support to others had lower blood pressure, thus improving health and longevity by stress reduction (Piferi and Lawler, 2006). University of California-Riverside found that happiness produced by giving to others is one of the most significant dimensions of human experience and emotional life (Lyubomirsky, 2019) University of California Berkley found that seniors who volunteer for two or three days per week are 44% less likely to die over a five-year period (even those with poor exercise habits, general health concerns, and negative habits, such as smoking (Oman, Thoreson, and McMahon, 1999). University of Michigan study found extended life benefits to seniors who provided volunteer and emotional support to help to friends, family, neighbors, and their spouses had a reduced risk of dying over a five year period of time (Brown, Nesse, Vinokur, and Smith, 2003).

Taken together these study findings are supported by the promise of God found in Psalm 41:1-3, that if we “consider the poor, that in the day of our trouble the Lord will deliver us” and raise us up from our sickbed. Matthew 10:42 summarized tells us that a relationship exists between how we treat the poor, needy, and vulnerable around us and our future reward. The Lord keeps intricate account records even to the detail of a cup of water given in his name (Mark 9:41). Proverbs 19:17 promises us that when we give to the poor that we are lending to God and that He will repay us for this act of faith

Citations

Brown, S. Nesse, R., Vinokur, A., Smith, D. (2003). Providing Social Support May Be
More Beneficial Than Receiving It: Results from a Prospective Study of Mortality
Accessed [Online] https://www.psychologicalscience.org/pdf/14_4Brown.cfm

Haltiwanger, J. (2014). The Science of Generosity: Why Giving Makes You So Happy. Accessed [Online} https://www.elitedaily.com/l…/science-generosity-feels-good-
give/890500

Lyubomirsky, S. (2019). Sonja Lyubomirsky Website. Accessed [Online]
http://sonjalyubomirsky.com/

Oman, D., Thoreson, C., and McMahon, K. (1999). Volunteerism and Mortality Among
the Community-Dwelling Elderly. Accessed [Online] https://journals.sagepub.com/…/a…/10.1177/135910539900400301

Piferi, R., and Lawler, K. (2006). Social Support and Ambulatory Blood Pressure: An
Examination of Both Receiving and Giving Accessed [Online] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16905215

#giving #givingtuesday #fundraising #benefits

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Crystal Mitchell posted a new update:
9 months ago

Update #3

What is Giving Tuesday?
I am frequently asked, Rick, what is Giving Tuesday and why is it important? Giving Tuesday is the Tuesday that follows Thanksgiving. Giving Tuesday was created in 2012 by 92nd Street Y and the United Nations Foundation to promote giving and help us remember that Christmas is about more than the commercialization and consumerism media messages that drive traffic to the stores to shop. Giving Tuesday reminds us that Christmas is about giving of oneself to help others. Giving Tuesday is about giving of money and volunteering of time and talent to each of our favorite charities for the benefit of others. Giving Tuesday is a global movement occurring in more than 100 countries that has grown from $10 Million in donations to $300 Million from 2 Million donors.

Why is Giving Tuesday important? Giving Tuesday was created as a global movement to motivate acts of charity. Whether you give $5 or $5,000 is irrelevant, because each gift is greatly appreciated by your charity. What is relevant is the hand and heart of goodwill that you share in helping your favorite charity to make a difference in our community and in the world. When you give on Giving Tuesday you are part of a global movement for good. There are many ways to get involved to help your favorite charity. These include:
1) Monetary Donation
2) In-Kind Donation (food, clothing, building materials, etc)
3) Volunteering of Time and Talent
4) Repost a Donation Link of Your Favorite Charity on Your Social Media pages
5) Post Articles to Highlight the Reason that You Support Your Favorite Charity

Why Do I Support Amazing Care Homes? I believe the organization is making a difference in the lives of the people it serves. Amazing Care Homes provides a place to live for persons who are homeless, veterans of the armed services, women who have been victims of domestic violence, and people who have been released from prison. In each of these cases, our residents have no other place to go. Without Amazing Care Homes our residents would be living on the streets. The focus is connecting our residents to needed services to help each of our residents go from dependency to independent living, thus a hand-up, not a hand-out.

#giving #givingtuesday #fundraising #thanksgiving #blackfriday #cybermonday

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Crystal Mitchell posted a new update:
9 months ago

Update #2

Giving Tuesday is only 1 week from today! Join the global movement of giving back a portion of what God has given you the ability to gain, for the benefit of those who are not as blessed . Be blessed in all that you do today and always is my prayer for you.

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Crystal Mitchell posted a new update:
9 months ago

Update #1

Why We Give
By: Rickey Brewer, Ed.D, MBA
November 12, 2019

Do you think about money occasionally or do you obsess and worry whether or not you have enough? When reduced to lowest terms, we have only four choices when it comes to our money. We can choose to spend it, save it, invest it, or give it. The choice that we make and the degree to which we choose to act among these alternatives says much about who we are and what we believe. Money can be a great servant, but it makes a terrible task master. Remember the words of Jesus recorded in Matthew 6:21, “for where your treasure is, there your heart will be also”. On July 24, 2014, Pope Francis tweeted in agreement with that Scripture by saying “when one lives attached to power, pride, or money, that it is impossible to be truly happy”.

Giving is big business in the United States. According to the National Philanthropic Trust, Americans gave $427.71 Billion in charitable giving in 2018. This is a .7% increase above the total giving of 2017. The largest amount, $292.09 Billion (68% of total giving) came from individuals. Foundations contributed $75.86 Billion (18% of total giving), Specific bequests accounted for $39.71 Billion (9% of total giving). Corporations gave $20.05 Billion (5% of total giving). Two of every three Americans contributed to charities last year. A study published by GuideStar looked at demographics of who are givers and found that race is not a factor in determining who would be most likely to donate to charity (Roberts, 2019). The study found that the most giving people are married couples, followed by single women, then single men (Roberts, 2019).

For many years, one assumption given to explain the generosity of Americans was that the United States tax code provided incentive. Prior to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, individuals could deduct 100% of charitable contributions to reduce their taxable income and income tax due. However, in the reform of 2017 individuals received higher standard deduction ($24,000 per married couple). In exchange for the increased standard deduction plus reduced tax bracket rates, the total taxable deductions needed to file the long form (the 1040), was increased to $24,000 (for a married couple).

The effect of this change in tax law was to eliminate the need for millions of tax filers to use the long form (1040) and with that elimination, the inability to use charitable deductions as reduction of taxable income. If we eliminate the financial incentive of tax benefit to explain our desire to give to charity, then what altruistic or other reasons can be found to explain our desire to give? Because a higher percentage of Americans give to charity, compared to the rest of the world, then it seems reasonable to ask whether the amount that we have affects what we give to charity. The logical answer to this question would seem to be yes because the greater amount a person has in his or her possession it logically follows that a greater amount is available to that person to be given to charity.

But closer examination finds that as the amount of money available to a person to give to charity increases, the percentage of the available amount actually donated tends to go down (Markman,2019). Middle and lower income Americans give a higher percentage of their available funds to charity, but wealthier Americans give more money (Markman, 2019). The question to be discussed in this post and susequent posts over the next two weeks is to understand the reasons why we give?

#giving #givingtuesday #fundraising #philanthropy

Citations
Markman, A. (2019). Does What You Have Affect What You Give? Accessed [Online] https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/ulterior-motives/201903/does-what-you-have-affect-what-you-give

Roberts, E. (2019). How Gender, Race, and Ethnicity Affect Charitable Giving. Accessed: [Online] https://trust.guidestar.org/how-gender-race-and-ethnicity-affect-charitable-giving

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