Forge Onward Anti-Bullying Animal Rescue

Forge Onward Anti-Bullying Animal Rescue

From Diana Simon

A non-profit with a goal to provide support not just for animals but also our bullied youth who feel there is no light at the end of the tunnel.

Support this campaign

Subscribe to follow campaign updates!

Recent Updates

Update #6

14 days ago

I hope everybody had a wonderful holiday.. With Christmas coming I wanted to add some perks to the campaign in hopes of raising funds and possibly helping you cross off one of your gifts you need to buy. We all know someone (including ourselves) who has experienced being bullied. It is something that never leaves your psyche, regardless of what we tell ourselves. It doesn't.
People, in their youth, tend to try and find their place in a ''click'. The goal is to fit in. It could be the jocks, the nerds, the cheerleaders, the popular click, etc. With age and time, we need to acknowledge, share and embrace the differences we have. Not be ashamed of our sexuality, nationality, diagnosis', beliefs, even our strengths. Have you noticed how people tend to downplay their strengths? Why?
The groups that tend to be bullied the most are the ones that are stereotyped, judged, assumed to be... The reason being that for some reason that don't want anyone to know they are different. Why not try to flip that? This cannot be done overnight.
We need to focus on those who have endured it for so long or so frequently that they see no hope in their future. That asking for help is not opening themselves up to being 'weak'. Imagine how desperate someone is, that decides to post a video of killing themselves. Those are the ones we need to help.
Forge Onward Anti-Bullying Animal Rescue is not at the point YET to start that chapter but we are forming a relationship with other rescues. We are educating ourselves on the care required for the variety of animals out there that need to be rescued. You can help us start to build our bridge to get to that. place.
Please consider making a donation. Please share this with others.

More Info

I have two sons. They were both bullied and  it changed them forever. The heart wrenching pain of hearing your child cry and say they don’t want to live is something you will never forget. You can love them more than anything but that won’t erase the pain they feel and how insignificant they believe they are. They lose hope. They lose trust. What I have experienced is one thing that they can and do trust, animals. They relate to those who need to be rescued. These animals can be a bridge.

The goal is to have an animal rescue where the employed are high functioning youth that cannot find appropriate employment. They will finally have a future, a purpose, contribute to society.  It will also be a place where those bullied can feel safe, rebuild trust and see that they can make a difference. They do matter. There will be a moment when they will hear the animal cry . They will check on them. Eyes will lock and they will see .. love. They will see they are needed and they will be rewarded in so many sweet ways. As they rebuild, get stronger, they will see their differences aren’t something to hide but something to embrace. 

The first step will be to raise funds to help care for all the rescues and their medical needs. After that we want to match animals that need to be rescued with others who have been bullied. Those who feel defeated and have lost trust in society. Our outreach program will start small. Working with students at schools and a phone line that will be secure and confidential if needed. This will be open to everyone. Parents, neighbors. Remember when we were young? If a child wasn’t seen for a couple days, neighbors would inquire. Ask if everything was okay. It was never interpreted are being ‘noisy’. It was a sense of community. I want to provide the kids/teens, with a ‘rescue/care package combination’. It will enable these animals to be cared for and help rebuild the trust those bullied have lost.  We will provide all the necessary items that will be required to care for this animal. Naturally it will match their capabilities. It is not meant to be stressful or a strain. It is giving them a purpose. They will also be assisted by mentors (who have been bullied)and would never have the opportunity to be that for anyone else. Both will have that affirmation. They will care for all aspects of the animal including vet appointments and finding adopters. There are so many animals needing to be rescued and no place for them. These kids feel the same. It’s for those who feel defeated, lost, crying for help. If they have an allergy. No problem. There are numerous types of animals that need to be rescued. Turtles, chickens, snakes. There will be no financial burden and we will provide support as needed. Animals can rebuild that void and we can. Once stable, I would like to have a rescue at a location where groups can come in and work with the animals, similar to a camp/therapy. This will then be able to provide the jobs for the high functioning. 

Campaign Wall

Join the Conversation

Sign in with your Facebook account or

Help Diana raise $5,000 by making a donation.

Diana Simon posted a new update:
14 days ago

Update #6

I hope everybody had a wonderful holiday.. With Christmas coming I wanted to add some perks to the campaign in hopes of raising funds and possibly helping you cross off one of your gifts you need to buy. We all know someone (including ourselves) who has experienced being bullied. It is something that never leaves your psyche, regardless of what we tell ourselves. It doesn't.
People, in their youth, tend to try and find their place in a ''click'. The goal is to fit in. It could be the jocks, the nerds, the cheerleaders, the popular click, etc. With age and time, we need to acknowledge, share and embrace the differences we have. Not be ashamed of our sexuality, nationality, diagnosis', beliefs, even our strengths. Have you noticed how people tend to downplay their strengths? Why?
The groups that tend to be bullied the most are the ones that are stereotyped, judged, assumed to be... The reason being that for some reason that don't want anyone to know they are different. Why not try to flip that? This cannot be done overnight.
We need to focus on those who have endured it for so long or so frequently that they see no hope in their future. That asking for help is not opening themselves up to being 'weak'. Imagine how desperate someone is, that decides to post a video of killing themselves. Those are the ones we need to help.
Forge Onward Anti-Bullying Animal Rescue is not at the point YET to start that chapter but we are forming a relationship with other rescues. We are educating ourselves on the care required for the variety of animals out there that need to be rescued. You can help us start to build our bridge to get to that. place.
Please consider making a donation. Please share this with others.

Join the Conversation

Sign in with your Facebook account or

Diana Simon posted a new update:
14 days ago

Update #5

I hope everybody had a wonderful holiday.. With Christmas coming I wanted to add some perks to the campaign in hopes of raising funds and possibly helping you cross off one of your gifts you need to buy. We all know someone (including ourselves) who has experienced being bullied. It is something that never leaves your psyche, regardless of what we tell ourselves. It doesn't.
People, in their youth, tend to try and find their place in a ''click'. The goal is to fit in. It could be the jocks, the nerds, the cheerleaders, the popular click, etc. With age and time, we need to acknowledge, share and embrace the differences we have. Not be ashamed of our sexuality, nationality, diagnosis', beliefs, even our strengths. Have you noticed how people tend to downplay their strengths? Why?
The groups that tend to be bullied the most are the ones that are stereotyped, judged, assumed to be... The reason being that for some reason that don't want anyone to know they are different. Why not try to flip that? This cannot be done overnight.
We need to focus on those who have endured it for so long or so frequently that they see no hope in their future. That asking for help is not opening themselves up to being 'weak'. Imagine how desperate someone is, that decides to post a video of killing themselves. Those are the ones we need to help.
Forge Onward Anti-Bullying Animal Rescue is not at the point YET to start that chapter but we are forming a relationship with other rescues. We are educating ourselves on the care required for the variety of animals out there that need to be rescued. You can help us start to build our bridge to get to that. place.
Please consider making a donation. Please share this with others.

Join the Conversation

Sign in with your Facebook account or

Diana Simon posted a new update:
25 days ago

Update #4

My two sons grew up with disabilities and were targets of relentless harassment and bullying. While bullying is certainly not a new phenomenon, only recently have we as a society, have seen the consequences and repercussions of this all too common and damaging behavior.
The result of this experience with my boys was a clear, manifest depression, compounded by suicidal thoughts. This can never be taken away or "unexperienced".
The ultimate goal, of course, is clearly prevention, however, there are countless youth in our lives that either have been or continue to be damaged by the trauma caused by relentless bullying. They feel shame about who they are. They feel there is no hope. Rarely, if at all, will they ask for help. Our challenge and obligation is to rebuild the trust and self-esteem that these young people have lost sight of.
When my sons began to work with animals and animal rescues, I saw a safe, renewed sense of purpose. They could feel significant and not alone. This was the catalyst for the FOABAR vision.
FOABAR will provide an experience and environment where youth will work with rescued animals. They will see that they can make a difference, experience responsibility, and have a purpose. Those working at Forge Onward Anti-Bulllying Animal Rescue will be high functioning. Typically they have a hard time finding employment in a traditional setting. They look like typical youth which makes it difficult for others to understand and empathize with them. This makes it difficult to have a job long term. With this position, they will be given a chance to be a role model, something they have never experienced.
At FOABAR, they will see that being different should be embraced rather than shunned.
Everyone has a story. Please help them see there can be a happy ending

Join the Conversation

Sign in with your Facebook account or

Diana Simon posted a new update:
about 1 month ago

Update #3

In a nutshell...
This is what you are investing in....
Our organization is going into its second year of operation. Bullying has become almost like an epidemic. Both of my children were bullied and it permanently changed them. They feel alone and struggle. They don't have any hope for the future and feel like they have no one. I found that with mine and I believe others, that the best way to help them is to rebuild their trust with animals. It will help them feel like they can make a difference, that they matter and that it's okay to be different. They aren't alone. We are in Phase one which is doing animal rescues, taking in babies, working with them until they are adopted. During this period we have also been making our self more present on social media and forming relationships with other rescues. We are starting to work together with others. This will help us in Phase two which is communicating with other anti-bullying organizations and getting the word out about our purpose. With this networking and promoting, we will be able to find kids, youth, that have been bullied. That are withdrawn. That continue to be bullied. We will work with schools, introduce ourselves to the kids in an effort to find out who is in need of our help. This will be a step by step process making sure not to take on more than we can handle. It may start with just a couple kids but that is okay. We will contact the parents after trying to get as much background information as we can. Our goal is the match the child/youth with a rescue that is in need of fostering. If they are allergic, there are other animals in need of care. We will provide them with the items they will need. This could be a crate, food, litter, toys and they will care for the rescue. They will be able to build a relationship and watch this animal grow. This will help their self esteem and they can start rebuilding themselves. A good portion of the employees will be high functioning youth in the late teens. They struggle to find jobs and people have a hard time empathizing with them since they look like every one else. This kids are very likely to have been bullied themselves. They will be able to relate to this kid. Showing him that being different is okay and not all of their peers are mean. As employees they will also be given a position that matches their capabilities. It could be taking photographs for social media. Taking care of the twitter posts. Work together finding ways they feel will help these others. The final phase will be a plot of land where we will have rescues/sanctuary and have weekend and/or weekly camps of youth bullied to come in and help care for them. There may be other instances where we know of another rescue in need of volunteers/help and we will go there for the day to help out and learn. The high functioning employees will (long term goal) have their own residence in the community. It could be a tiny house or a mobile home. A place to call their own, where they can be employed and actually be proud to share their differences with the kids that come in. The biggest fear for families of these kids are what if they pass away. What will happen to them? This will help them know that there child can survive and have a job, place to live. That would be the final phase. A community that both animals and these bullied kids can feel safe and see that they are capable and rebuild their self esteem

Join the Conversation

Sign in with your Facebook account or

Diana Simon posted a new update:
3 months ago

Update #2

A 10-year-old boy who needed hospital treatment after being beaten up by bullies, refused to fight back because “it’s not the Jedi way”, his mother said.

Lizette Casanova said her son Aiden Vasquez “felt it in his soul not to hit the kid back”, while being tormented by a classmate at his California school.

The Star Wars fan’s ordeal came to the attention of Mark Hamill – who played Luke Skywalker in the film series – who said of the boy, he was “astonished by his wisdom and courage”.

Police are investigating an allegation of assault after Ms Casanova lodged a criminal complaint about the bullying.

She also called for her son’s school, Two Bunch Palms primary in Desert Hot Springs, to take action.

“This is the third year my son is bullied,” she wrote on Facebook. “Last year he had to get stitches on his face from getting ‘pushed’, [and he was] losing his breath on the playground for getting thrown down.”

She added: “Now we’re making hospital visits, and I’m pressing charges.”

Aiden needed stitches after suffering a 3in cut during the latest incident, on Monday morning, which began with a 10-year-old classmate taking his backpack, his mother alleged.

She posted a picture of her son, with a bloodied face and swollen eye, on Facebook.

Ms Casanova said it was the second time he had needed hospital treatment because of bullies.

She wrote: “Aiden wants me to let everyone know he’s doing fine all stitched up and numb... he said he felt it in his soul not to hit the kid back. It’s not the Jedi way!”

After Aiden’s story was brought to the attention of Hamill on Twitter, the actor tweeted: “I’m astonished by his wisdom and courage [at] such a tender age.

“I may be a fictional Jedi, but this boy is the real deal.

“I hope he sees this message and knows how much I admire him.”

Aiden’s uncle responded to the tweet with a picture of the 10-year-old giving a thumbs-up, writing: “He’s right here and says THANK YOU!”

Two Bunch Palms headteacher Joseph Scudder promised to investigate the bullying.

“We wanted to reassure our families that the safety of our students is our number one priority,” he told the Palm Springs Desert Sun newspaper. “All incidents and complaints are taken seriously and investigated thoroughly, and this incident is no exception.”

Police confirmed to the newspaper they were investigating an allegation of assault

Join the Conversation

Sign in with your Facebook account or

Diana Simon posted a new update:
3 months ago

Update #1

A Colorado mother is sharing the story of her 9-year-old son who died by suicide Thursday, just days after coming out to his classmates, Denver's Fox affiliate reports.

Leia Pierce says her son, Jamel Myles, announced he was gay this summer. Pierce said the 9-year-old was terrified, but she reassured her son she still loved him. Myles also expressed an interest in dressing in a more feminine manner when he entered fourth grade in the fall.

Less than a week after he started school and came out to his peers, Myles was dead.

"Four days is all it took at school," Pierce told the TV station. "I could just imagine what they said to him. My son told my oldest daughter the kids at school told him to kill himself. I'm just sad he didn't come to me. ... I'm so upset that he thought that was his option."

Pierce wants schools to take more action against bullying, and she believes parents should be held responsible if their children torment other students.

Denver Public Schools is providing social workers and a "crisis team" to aid students affected by Myles's death. The Denver Police Department is also investigating the case.

If you are a trans or gender-nonconforming person considering suicide, Trans Lifeline can be reached at (877) 565-8860. LGBTQ youth (ages 24 and younger) can reach the Trevor Project Lifeline at (866) 488-7386. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at (800) 273-8255 can also be reached 24 hours a day by people of all ages and identities.

Join the Conversation

Sign in with your Facebook account or