Build Reuse in Communities across the US

Build Reuse in Communities across the US

From Build Reuse

Please help us share with communities the tools and knowledge to embrace deconstruction and the reuse of building materials to create local jobs, economic opportunities, and reduce our reliance on our natural resources.

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Update #3

about 1 month ago

Why do we reuse materials.
Fun? yes!
Profit? not so much :)
Because we care about the planet our children and grandchildren will inherit? Absolutely!

The "shopper" in this photo is why what we do matters. When I was this age our society was actively dismantling most of the systems for reuse that were in place for centuries. Yup, we had a milkman; the cutting edge now seems to be about bringing him back. Sweet, love it.
The milk man is symbolic, the milk bottle refilled is a symbol of so much that we have lost track of on our quest for an economy based on maximizing human interests on this planet. Our greatest challenge as a society now is to evolve still further into a world where we continue to reinvest our material wealth to further our species and protect all the other ones too.
Build Reuse was renamed such because we believe that the materials in our buildings can not be wasted if we want to pass anything like what we know on to those that follow us.

And Build Reuse needs to grow, so that we can help our world evolve into the next phase of human life on this planet. Reuse helps to embody carbon, it helps to preserve natural resources, it helps create vibrant communities through job creation and resource upcycling.
And we can not grow without your support.

To be honest we are no where near the goal for this fundraiser. We need all of your help to spread the word, donate, and maybe even pass on to your entire network.

So, thanks again everyone! Keep sharing and posting. We can get there...
Joe

Don't forget there are many other ways you can support Build Reuse. Check out some of the options here.

More Info

It's estimated that we will double our total building stock over the next 40 years. Its also said that 1/3rd of our present  buildings will come down in the next 30 years. 

Imagine 1/3 of the buildings in your neighborhood, town, or city, being demolished and the materials landfilled. Imagine that at the same time our forests and other resources continue to be mined for new materials. 

We all live and work in buildings, that is not going to change. So we will be building more; it's how we utilize the existing resources in our communities that will make the biggest impact moving forward. 

So my big question is, where will the materials come from for the new building? and what will we do with the materials coming down? If we don't deconstruct those building and reuse the materials then all of those new buildings will be coming from virgin resources! To avoid this we can not afford to waste the materials we have already invested in. 

Meanwhile, many local communities lack economic opportunities, face under-employment of our marginalized populations, and are dealing with thousands of blighted homes. 

Build Reuse is about giving communities the tools to reinvest those materials in ways that create jobs in deconstruction and reuse centers, create economic opportunity for small local businesses, remove blight, and save resources. 

We believe that dollar for dollar this is one of the wisest investments a community can make. And its from materials that are otherwise wasted. 

Reuse is local. It builds economies, it builds lives, it builds community. We have seen it again and again throughout the country, but not nearly enough. It needs to become the standard practice it once was to make the difference we need. Imagine again that 1/3rd of houses in your neighborhood coming down. What if all that material went to local reuse centers and were reinvested right into your community! What if they helped put to work some of your marginalized community members? What if small businesses popped up turning these materials into furniture, art, and other necessities? Its not far fetched, it happens on a small scale in many communities. Our goal is to make it happen everywhere. 

Please help if you can. Be a part of building reuse! 

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Help Build raise $30,000 by making a donation.

Build Reuse posted a new update:
about 1 month ago

Update #3

Why do we reuse materials.
Fun? yes!
Profit? not so much :)
Because we care about the planet our children and grandchildren will inherit? Absolutely!

The "shopper" in this photo is why what we do matters. When I was this age our society was actively dismantling most of the systems for reuse that were in place for centuries. Yup, we had a milkman; the cutting edge now seems to be about bringing him back. Sweet, love it.
The milk man is symbolic, the milk bottle refilled is a symbol of so much that we have lost track of on our quest for an economy based on maximizing human interests on this planet. Our greatest challenge as a society now is to evolve still further into a world where we continue to reinvest our material wealth to further our species and protect all the other ones too.
Build Reuse was renamed such because we believe that the materials in our buildings can not be wasted if we want to pass anything like what we know on to those that follow us.

And Build Reuse needs to grow, so that we can help our world evolve into the next phase of human life on this planet. Reuse helps to embody carbon, it helps to preserve natural resources, it helps create vibrant communities through job creation and resource upcycling.
And we can not grow without your support.

To be honest we are no where near the goal for this fundraiser. We need all of your help to spread the word, donate, and maybe even pass on to your entire network.

So, thanks again everyone! Keep sharing and posting. We can get there...
Joe

Don't forget there are many other ways you can support Build Reuse. Check out some of the options here.

Join the Conversation

Sign in with your Facebook account or

Build Reuse posted a new update:
2 months ago

Update #2

Our country "consumes 3 billion tons of newly extracted raw materials annually" according to Kathryn Rogers Merlino, author of “Building Reuse: Sustainability, Preservation, and the Value of Design”.
At the same time 40% of our waste is construction and demolition related.
This is an incredible waste of both old and new materials.

We need to do better.

The reuse of building materials through deconstruction creates 7 jobs for every 1 job in demolition. So we are not just wasting previously extracted raw materials. We are wasting the potential to reinvest those materials into our communities. We are wasting resources that can put people to work creating new products and new opportunities out of the amazing wealth of what already exists!

Reuse of building materials can be an incredibly powerful economic driver. And one that is localized. Think of our buildings as materials banks, as a repository of previously harvested raw materials.
Think of building materials also as historic and cultural artifacts, as echoes of our past and our rich heritage.

We believe that waste is at the heart of so many of our present issues, and we also believe that working with what we already have is an essential part of the solution!

If you agree then please join us in supporting reuse in communities across the country, including yours!
Donate, share and like our post, and look for the nearest reuse center :)
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Build Reuse posted a new update:
3 months ago

Update #1

Thanks to all of you that have donated we are over 10% of our goal. We hit 3,000 this morning so 2 more zeros and we will meet our target :)

The photo here is from our friends at Old Windows Workshop. OWW is a great example of how reuse can be a powerful way to lift up our communities, save materials and change lives! Help us spread the word and increase our ability to help other communities!

"Old Window Workshop Cooperative (OWWC), is a women worker-owned cooperative based in Springfield's South End. OWWC provides employment and business ownership opportunity for women struggling with poverty. Our cooperative contributes to economic empowerment for women resulting in strong families and safer communities.​"

Thanks again everyone! Keep sharing and posting. Joe

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