5 Things You Must Do With a Log Cabin In Winter

5 Things You Must Do With a Log Cabin In Winter

From Grizley Gain

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Log cabins are probably the most popular trend in real estate today. People are in love with these gorgeous dwellings, especially as the McMansions that are so common continue to spread across the country. Who wants to live in something so cheaply made, especially when it looks exactly the same as every other boring house on the block?

But one of the drawbacks about log cabins is that they do require more maintenance. It is worth it, especially when considering value and permanence. After all, a log cabin can last for generations, where a cheaply made house can fall apart before the mortgage is even paid.

Here are five things you must do with a log cabin in winter to keep it in tip top condition.

Inspect The Outside

The outside of your cabin is where problems are most likely to occur. Weather can seriously wear down the condition of the outside and in areas where the climate is more extreme it is worst. Damp is especially bad for wood, which can rot or warp, though sunshine can cause cracks and dryness in the logs.

Every new season it is important than you do an inspection to make sure there are no impending issues that could cause problems. For instance, you might notice a thumb sized area of one of your walls it soft and presses inward. This is a sign of rot and once it has started it can quickly grow out of control. Or maybe you see a plank that has bulged out. This is wood warping, usually caused by moisture behind the wood that has caused it to expand outward.

Catching these things before the snow falls makes it easier to replace or repair anything that needs to be, It also gives you a chance to restain, something you should do to the wood every three to five years.

Inspect The Inside

Once the outside is secure it is time to go inside to see what might be done there. A log cabin is pretty solid and cozy, so hopefully you won't run into any issues. But there are some that are possible to come across so you should always be vigilant in your inspections.

The first problem to look out for is signs of pests. As the weather turns colder, different creatures are going to seek shelter from the chill. Mice, insects, spiders and even small mammals like raccoons could be trying to find a way into your home as you read this. Once they get in they can wreak havoc, especially those that have burrowed into the wood like termites. They can cause damage to your house, due to scratching, biting, burrowing and waste.

Look for any signs of these critters. Go to the smaller areas of the house, like dark corners, unused rooms, closets, basements, attics or crawlspaces. Put a couple of barrier methods around your house to prevent anything from crossing over.

If you do find signs of an infestation, either bug bomb/spray yourself, or contact an exterminator who can lay out traps or fumigate for you. The sooner in the season you get it done, the better.

Pre-Spring Clean

We have all heard of Spring Cleaning, but Pre-Spring Cleaning may be even more crucial. If your house isn't ready for the winter it isn't ready for you to settle in and be comfortable during the frigid months ahead.

This includes removing all dust, mold and dirt from inside your home, freshening rooms that aren't as commonly used, cleaning carpets or polishing hardwood floors, storing items for warmer months and cleaning/preparing ones for the colder and opening the chute to your fireplace and making sure it is clean and ready to go.

This might seem like a lot of work, but it is going to ensure your winter is a wonderland and not a nightmare.

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